Eat Healthy With Your Own Organic Garden

Ready to begin with your own organic garden? Do you know where to start or how to begin with it? Do you know what products will work for your garden? If you have no clue how to answer these last couple questions, the tips that are listed below are for you.

Reduce the need for pesticides in your garden by planting native crops. Native plants will have a better resistance against the bugs and bacteria of your area, and will be better equipped to compete with native weeds. Native plants will attract beneficial native insects, such as ladybugs, which can naturally control pest problems without the need for chemicals.

A great way to calculate the timing for planting your plants in an organic garden is to use a seed-starting chart. You should do your research and fill in the chart in advance. Once you have it, you can use the chart to plan your planting through the entire season.

When starting your organic garden, you must be sure you have the proper size containers because containers are crucial for holding your plants. Your containers should be around two or three inches in depth for them to be effective. In addition, you should make sure you have holes in the bottom of your containers for drainage purposes.

When building or maintaining a compost pile, it is important not to add coal ash or charcoal to the pile. Both ash and charcoal have high amounts of iron and sulfur, as well as other unwanted chemicals, that may pollute the soil and potentially harm the health of your plants.

Paying attention to spacing is important. You must think of how much room the plants will take up as they grow, and it easy to underestimate this. Plants need room for physical growth and for the air to circulate within the soil. Make sure that you map out your garden layout beforehand and place your seeds with an adequate amount of space in between each.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

Do you know how to begin your own organic garden now? Can you now find a place to begin with it? Do you know what will work for your seeds? If you can now provide an answer to these questions, then you have read and understood the previous tips and are ready to grow your own organic garden.