Four Ways To Prepare Your Garden For Winter

Whether you want your landscape plush with healthy grass, county fair award-winning flowers or a back yard filled with fresh vegetables, you need to know how to reap a glorious garden. This article contains many tips to help you do just that, and if you don’t already have a green thumb, you will by the time you’re done reading.

When planting next season’s vegetable garden, it is important to rotate some of the crops. For example, potatoes and tomatoes should be planted in a different spot because they are both prone to the same diseases. Keep your vegetable garden healthy and thriving by learning which crops need rotating and why.

To make your garden more productive, allocate space based on what grows best in your area instead of simply choosing your most favorite crops. Although you may love beets, if tomatoes grow better in your climate then give them more room in your garden and make your beet plantings smaller. Ask your neighbors or take a look around your area to see what grows best in your region.

When boiling or steaming vegetables, keep the water that the vegetables were cooked in and let it cool. Use the water to water the garden with. It is packed with all the vitamins and minerals that were in the vegetables when they were cooked and will help the plants grow as a natural plant food.

If you’re looking for a natural fungicide to protect the seed flats or trays that you plant this fall or winter, the solution is easy. Simply put a dusting of sphagnum moss that is milled or ground across the top of the flats or sprinkle it between each row of seeds. The acid in the moss helps to prevent the development of fungus, keeping your seedlings strong and healthy.

Make sure your pot is the right size for your plant. If the pot is too small, the plant’s roots may not have enough room to grow. The roots will become “root bound”, stop growing, and begin to suffocate. The size of the root system can determine the size of your plant and yield.

Pick garden vegetables often and early. While immature, many types of vegetables are very tasty in their young phase. Snap peas, little summer squash, cucumbers, and budding broccoli can be picked to keep the plants in a state of reproduction for a longer period of time. This will also increase yields with a second harvest off of the same plants.

If you are growing vegetables in your garden, it is important that you have them in a spot where they can get at least six hours of sun a day. Most vegetables need that much sun to grow rapidly and successfully. The same can be said for some flowers.

Now that you know what it takes to achieve all of your gardening goals, you are ready to go outside make them happen. Go grow your ten-foot tall sunflowers, plant those tomatoes that you’ve wanted to grow forever or create a front lawn that makes every neighbor on the block jealous. Enjoy your new green thumb.