Great Organic Gardening Tricks From The Pros

As fun as planning to grow your own organic garden may seem, it is very important to start doing your research and getting your equipment before you do so. Another thing is to take your climate into account, so you know what can grow and what cannot. Basically, the sensible advice that you have, the better. The tips below can certainly help you.

When taking an organic path to control garden pests, try to build up the soil to allow healthy microbes to flourish. Earthworms are also very important to organic gardening and they should be encouraged to stay in the soil. When the soil is unhealthy, it is not as resistant to pests.

When starting your organic garden, you must be sure you have the proper size containers because containers are crucial for holding your plants. Your containers should be around two or three inches in depth for them to be effective. In addition, you should make sure you have holes in the bottom of your containers for drainage purposes.

Tend to your garden a few steps at a time. A garden requires ongoing maintenance, and becomes a big time drain if you let things pile up until the weekend. Stop by the garden for a few minutes each day and deadhead some flowers while you’re waiting for dinner to cook or pull a few weeds while watching the kids play.

Use organic mulch. Any material that is spread over the soil is considered mulch. It helps to keep weeds at bay, holds moisture in the soil, and keeps the ground cool in summer and warm in winter. Examples of mulch include compost, shredded leaves, fine wood chips, straw and grass clippings.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

A great tip when opening up your own organic garden is to mist your mix with a spray bottle. If you do not have a spray bottle, then set your trays in water. This is needed so that your mix will get the proper amount of moisture from below the surface.

If you aren’t ready to devote your time and energy to a full organic garden or just don’t have the space for one, use a container instead. Look for plants that are small and well suited for containers. Whiskey barrels are great for container gardens because they have plenty of room for roots to grow and can be used for multiple varieties of plants.

When watering your garden, consider a soaker hose instead of using a hose or watering can. If you turn the soaker hoses pressure onto low, you can leave your water on for hours which will allow a part of your garden to be slowly irrigated. This can provide you with time to do other things.

Plant slightly more than you will need. Pests and poor weather can diminish yields from your garden, especially if you are new to organic gardening. To account for this possibility, plant a little more than what you will need. However, don’t go overboard, if it is successful, you could have more vegetables than you could possibly use.

If you need to protect your plants in your organic garden from frost either early in the season or at the end of the season, here’s a great frugal way to cover them. Milk jugs, soda bottles and other plastic containers you can find around the house are perfect to protect your precious plants from the harsh frost.

Planning for your own organic garden is exciting. You can now apply your newly acquired knowledge so that you can start growing healthier, happier plants, that bear a lot of produce for you and your family.