Grow The Healthy Way: Organic Gardening Techniques

Growing an organic garden might appear very complicated and involved, but if you know what you are doing, it can be a very exciting experience. If you don’t know what you are doing, you can waste a lot of money and watch alot of your plants die. The tips listed below can help you avoid this.

Protect your seeds from fungus with natural products. You can use milled sphagnum moss to protect all your plants. If your seeds need light to grow, sprinkle the moss first and then place your seeds. This solution is much better than any chemicals you can find in a store and will protect your seeds efficiently.

By adding a nice layer of bio-degradable material (mulch) around your plants, you can utilize the natural pest-fighting ability within the mulch to stop predators to your plants. By putting a one to two inch layer around your plants, you are also adding a source of nutrients and a source of water.

Avoid chemicals in your garden. Keep the toxins out of the food and the water supply. One of the best parts about organic gardening is eliminating chemical compounds from your food supply. There are many alternatives to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Almost any problem can be cured with the right management.

When beginning your own organic garden, you should always make sure you moisten your mix that is in the containers before you sow the seeds. If your mix is not moist, it will dry out. This could cause your plant to die before it is given a chance to grow.

Most organic fertilizers will not harm the soft roots of plants, unlike, synthetic fertilizers. A great way to use an organic fertilizer is to mix it with the top two inches of soil next to the plant. This is called side-dressing, and it is usually worked into the soil during the growing season.

Care for your compost. Cover your compost pile with a lid, tarp or black plastic. Sunlight will kill the bacteria that do the composting, so the outer layers of a compost pile that is exposed to the sun will not break down. Water the compost pile regularly, keeping it evenly moist. Do not over-water, as a soggy compost pile will rot. Turn the pile every two to five days to aerate and provide oxygen to the bacteria. If necessary, add a composting activator to speed up the process.

The watering needs of your garden will vary considerably, depending on your climate zone and the time of year. The amount of water needed will change based on time of the day, the content of your municipal water and what your soil make-up is. For instance, in warm and balmy locations, it is important not to water leaves, as doing so tends to foster fungus growth. Instead, keep the root system well-watered.

So, as you can see growing an organic garden is not as complicated as it appears. It is involved in terms of research, hard work, and patience, but the personal rewards make it worth it in the end. With the above tips in mind, you should be smarter when it comes to growing your own organic garden.