Having A Hard Time With Organic Gardening? Try These Techniques!

Taking a step into the wondrous and green land of organic gardening for the very first time might feel a tad bit intimidating, but by keeping the helpful tips listed below in mind, you will soon find yourself growing organic plants on par with some of the best organic gardeners in the field.

When you buy seeds for your garden, be sure to purchase seeds that are labeled “certified organic.” This ensures that your plants will be organic throughout their lifespan and that the seeds you are buying aren’t contaminated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Watch out for labels, such as “genetically engineered” or any mention of “natural” that does not include the phrase “certified organic.”

If sustainability and organic gardening are appealing to you, leave a portion of the property you own undeveloped to give wildlife a place to thrive. As the natural wildlife begins to flourish, the various insects, birds, and other natural life around will all blend together and actually assist your garden as it begins to grow.

If you don’t have the space to have an actual garden in the ground, it’s perfectly acceptable to have an organic garden in containers. There are only a few root vegetables like asparagus that won’t grow well in containers, so feel free to explore. Containers are perfect to grow organic tomatoes, green beans, green onions and many other organic vegetables.

An organic alternative to chemical fertilizer is compost. You can make your own compost by using fruits, vegetables and other organic wastes from your home. Compost gives your soil the nutrients it needs and improves its structure.

Use compost to feed your crops. In organic gardening, compost is necessary for the survival of your plants. A home compost pile is a great, inexpensive source of compost. Many food scraps, grass, and dry leaves can be used in your compost. However, avoid cooked foods, ash, and animal waste in an organic compost pile.

When watering your garden, consider a soaker hose instead of using a hose or watering can. If you turn the soaker hoses pressure onto low, you can leave your water on for hours which will allow a part of your garden to be slowly irrigated. This can provide you with time to do other things.

Composting is a great way to fuel your garden. You can add pretty much anything, like grass clippings, shredded paper, coffee grounds, and much more. Basically, you can use anything that was living at one time (but try to avoid animal products). If you buy some worms and keep the compost bin in a warm, sunny place it will turn into perfectly dark and rich soil in no time.

You can make a raised bed with untreated wood, brick, or stone. When selecting wood, make certain you pick untreated products that have a natural resistance to rot. Cypress, cedar or locust wood are appropriate selections. It is particular important that you don’t use treated wood for vegetable beds, as the chemicals and toxins on the wood could leach into the soil and be absorbed by food plants. If your existing garden structure contains treated wood, at least take the time to make a plastic lining beneath the soil.

Do your homework. Gardening, and organic gardening in particular, depends on a lot of variables including crop, climate, weather, soil, and pests. To be successful requires a lot of trial and error. To be as informed as possible, read as many books, articles, and blogs on organic gardening as you can. Those written about your state can be especially informative.

So, after reading and applying the helpful tips listed above, you should feel a bit more at ease in the land of organic gardening. You have the tools, and it’s time to use them. You should feel excited and ready to begin your organic gardening adventure to grow healthier organic produce.