How To Create A Thriving Organic Garden

Long, long before mega-marts appeared offering two-thousand different types of food, people were wholly self-reliant and grew their own produce for sustenance. These days, whether it’s to get healthier or save some money, people are returning to those old days of organic gardening. Read these tips and find out how you can become a great gardener.

Select perennials to reduce the amount of care your garden requires. Plants that return year after year usually require only a modicum of weeding and pruning. Edible perennials, such as asparagus, rhubarb, and sorrel, can provide an excellent salad addition for your household without causing too much work for you.

Planting a bare-root rose. Bare-root roses are best planted at the beginning of their dormant period to lessen the shock of transplanting. If the roots look dry, soak them in a bucket of water for a few hours before planting. Remove diseased or damaged stems, and trim any thick roots by a third. Place the rose in a freshly dug hole, spreading out the roots and checking that the bud union is slightly above ground level. Backfill with soil and water thoroughly.

When the vegetable season is over, grow a shoulder season crop if possible. Fruits like strawberries or raspberries bear fruit very early or very late in the season before or after the summer vegetable crops take over and can be planted. Raspberries can be planted to bear fruit in the fall and strawberries can be planted to bear fruit in the spring.

Pick garden vegetables often and early. While immature, many types of vegetables are very tasty in their young phase. Snap peas, little summer squash, cucumbers, and budding broccoli can be picked to keep the plants in a state of reproduction for a longer period of time. This will also increase yields with a second harvest off of the same plants.

Don’t buy plant pots. Commercial plant plots from the garden center can be very expensive, anything from $5 to $100. Any container with a few draining holes pierced into the bottom of it can serve as a plant pot, so to save a lot of money, start recycling food containers today.

Make a do it yourself twine holder by grabbing a rolled up length of twine and putting it into a small clay pot. Pull a small portion of the twine out the drainage hole and flip the pot upside down. You will always know where your twine is instead of digging around for it in a toolbox or shed.

If you have many potted plants, do not water them all the same way. Some plants do well with plenty of water, whereas other plants might prefer a drier soil. Over-watering can do as much damage to a plant as under-watering. So, be mindful of what types of plants that you have in the pots, and water them appropriately.

There are many reasons one may wish to go to the opposite direction of modern technology and growing techniques. Regardless of your reasons, you can use these organic gardening tips to grow some of the best produce of your life. Focus on what you’ve learned here and implement these tactics.