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How To Grow An Organic Garden Like A Pro

What do you know about organic gardening? Do you have some gardening techniques? If you do, do you wish to improve upon them? Is what you’re using working with your organic garden or against it? If you cannot answer these questions confidently, look at the tips below to help grow a better organic garden.

Start your organic garden with a good strategic plan. This helps you know exactly where each plant will go in your garden so that you can maximize the few hours you have to garden each day. As part of your plan, take notes on what plants you will use to replace short-lived crops such as spinach and lettuce.

If you don’t have the space to have an actual garden in the ground, it’s perfectly acceptable to have an organic garden in containers. There are only a few root vegetables like asparagus that won’t grow well in containers, so feel free to explore. Containers are perfect to grow organic tomatoes, green beans, green onions and many other organic vegetables.

Water your plants during the morning to avoid having fungal growth that generally prefers moisture and darkness. By watering your plants during the day they are best able to take advantage of the sun, and utilize the suns anti-bacterial effects. Some bacteria or fungi are light sensitive, so by watering during the day you benefit the plant by reducing the growth potential of its competitors.

Weed control in your organic garden will be more challenging than a conventional garden because you can’t use chemical herbicides. One of the best ways to control weeds without using chemicals is creating ground cover with mulch. Save tree trimmings and grass clippings from elsewhere in your garden and spread them around your plants to a depth of about 3 inches. This should be enough to prevent weeds from germinating and growing.

Choose a site for fruit trees depending on their specific requirements. Most fruit trees require 8 hours of sun per day. Morning sun is important, as it dries dew rapidly, helping to prevent fungus. Avoid planting fruit trees in a low spot in the garden where frost or cold air can collect. Some fruit trees are especially susceptible to late frost damage, and are better planted on a north-facing slope. This is especially true for peach, plum, cherry and apricot trees.

When you are thinking about starting an organic garden, figure out a plan. Creating a plan for where you want to place each plant will be time saving. If you have a short amount of time that can be spent in your garden, having a plan could help you make the most out of that time.

If you have the space, building a compost bin can be a great way to save money and always have compost at the ready. When planning your bin, consider a three-sided bin rather than a four-sided bin. A three-sided bin allows you to easily access the heap for regular turning without reaching over a wall or using a gate.

A natural, albeit somewhat tedious, way to keep pests and fungus from destroying your organic fruit crop is to use plastic zipper bags. When the fruits are still young on the branches, place them in large zipper bags secured at the top with staples. Cut off a bottom corner to allow for adequate drainage.

Are you more informed when it comes to organic gardening? Do you have a gardening technique or do you have a better gardening technique now? Can you now use things that work with your organic garden? Hopefully, the tips above should have given you advice on growing a better organic garden.

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