How To Grow An Organic Garden The Right Way

Is store-bought produce a little bland for your tastes? Is produce from organic growers at farmer’s markets much too expensive? Read on to find out how you can stop relying on others for your fruits and vegetables, by building and maintaining your own home organic garden, full of delicious produce!

When you buy seeds for your garden, be sure to purchase seeds that are labeled “certified organic.” This ensures that your plants will be organic throughout their lifespan and that the seeds you are buying aren’t contaminated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Watch out for labels, such as “genetically engineered” or any mention of “natural” that does not include the phrase “certified organic.”

Making your own compost for organic gardening is extremely simple and easy to do. It provides soil of gardens with rich nutrients and keeps soil cool during summer months. You can use kitchen waste, sawdust, aquarium water, coffee grounds, tea leaves, rabbit or hamster droppings, a thin layer of lawn clippings, spices and eggshells in your compost.

It is important to rotate your organic plants regularly when you are attempting to grow an indoor garden. Plants bend toward wherever a light source is. If you do not rotate your plants there is a good chance that they will all bend toward one side which will limit the amount of vegetables that grow on the plants.

A great way to assure a successful organic garden year after year is to keep a gardening journal. You simply need to jot down what vegetables do well and those that don’t, as well as certain pests or other issues that your garden runs into. By doing this, you’ll know what to change or keep the same the following year, resulting in a gorgeous organic garden.

You can save time by using soaker hoses. Instead of standing with a hose for a long time or having to refill a container, set your water pressure on low and let your hose sit next to the plant that needs to be watered. Do not forget to turn the water off later.

Don’t harm your native critters. Some animals can naturally keep the bug population down; one such example of a good pest-predator is the bat. Bats are well-known for being bug consumers. Since your garden may sometimes look like a tasty treat to these tiny critters, having bats around can help reduce their population naturally, without the usage of harmful pesticides.

Now that you’ve read these tips on building and maintaining your very own organic garden right in your back yard, why wait! Stop relying on stores and farmers to give you produce that you could be growing on your own property, grown with love and pesticide free! Build your organic garden today!