Live Chemical Free By Growing It Yourself

You probably have friends who claim to eat only organic, or maybe you’ve seen these items in the store. It is easy to tell the organic items from those that are not. The organic products cost more, and they often come in distinctive packaging. You can cut the store out of the equation and save a lot of money by planting your own patch of organic vegetables in the back yard!

Your plants will respond better to gradual changes of environment. Put the plants outside in the sun for one to two hours in the beginning. As time goes by, slowly increase the time they spent outdoors. When the week is done, your plants will be ready for the big move without any problems.

Choose perennials that won’t be taken out by slugs. Slugs and snails can decimate a plant in one night. These pests gravitate to young perennials with smooth, tender, thin leaves. Some perennials, however, leave a bad taste in slugs’ mouths or are difficult to chew through because their leaves aren’t tender. Some perennial families that snails and slugs won’t eat include achillea, campanula, and helleborus.

Use both annuals and biennials to add a splash of color to your flower beds. The annuals and biennials are usually fast growing because they only last one season, and this will let you change the garden every season for a nice change of pace. They are useful for filling gaps in between shrubs and perennials in sunny areas. Notable biennials and annuals include marigold, sunflowers, hollyhock, petunia, and cosmos.

Plant cool-weather edibles in the fall. Rather than putting standard clay vessels into use when planting crops of lettuce and kale, think about using pumpkins instead. Use some Wilt-Pruf to prevent your pumpkin from decomposing and then you can put your plants right inside. Once this is done, you are ready to plant!

Whenever you are planting a veggie garden, it is vital that you place them in a location where sun shines down on them for six or more hours per day. This allows the vegetables to grow quickly and healthily. The same can be said for some flowers.

Deciduous shrubs should be protected from the elements. Tender, potted shrubs must be protected when the weather is cold. Pull the canes together at the top and securely tie them. Next, using a sheet or perhaps even a blanket, cover the structure. This method is superior to covering plants in plastic, because air can freely circulate, which prevents rotting.

Growing your garden at home might not be the most convenient thing for you, but you will save a lot of money and always have the confidence that what you’re eating and feeding your family is as fresh and as healthy as possible. Use the tips you’ve learned here and get started on your garden today.