Love Gardening? Try These Organic Gardening Tips

Many people see organic gardening as a way to contribute to the safe-keeping of our beautiful planet. For others it presents the opportunity to put nutrient-rich and chemical-free food on the table. Both are laudible reasons. Whatever your reason is, you may find that these suggestions really help.

Take your seedlings and saplings to a cooler spot once they are established. As your plants grow, move them away from the source of heat. Plastic films should be removed on the containers, as that helps to keep out humidity and warmth. Keep an eye on your seeds in order to know when you should do this.

When raising an organic garden, sometimes a solution to resolving bad soil is to raise your garden bed. Building a garden bed or roost above the regular soil, can allow you to put your own fertilized soil within the bed without the risk of the soil becoming diluted or mixed in with the surrounding area.

Know the benefits of composting. Composting is one of the best things you can do for your organic garden. Composting improves moisture levels, promotes fertility, and stimulates plant roots. You can start your own composting at home, and reduce your household waste, as well as get free food for your garden.

Encourage toads to take up residence in your organic garden. Toads are a natural predator of many of the pesky bugs that will eat and destroy your crops. Create makeshift toad houses out of overturned broken clay pots and keep soil nice and moist to make it conducive to amphibian life.

To keep rodents, deer, and other pesky animals away from your organic garden, use organic repellents. A spray made from hot peppers can be effective. Otherwise try a spray containing urine or rotten eggs. Regardless of what you use, apply the sprays liberally and reapply regularly especially after a rain shower.

Use organic mulch. Any material that is spread over the soil is considered mulch. It helps to keep weeds at bay, holds moisture in the soil, and keeps the ground cool in summer and warm in winter. Examples of mulch include compost, shredded leaves, fine wood chips, straw and grass clippings.

If you have low-growing weeds, such as lamium or chickweed, use a fast method to remove them. If your weeds have grown into a mat, you can use a sharp spade to slice beneath the weeds. Once the weeds are cut, you should turn them over which will bury the leaves. The leaves will rot and nourish your soil.

When you’re making a compost pile, you should use fresh and dried plants to get it started. Garden wastes, such as grass clippings, are classified as green materials. Dried material includes straw, shredded paper, and cardboard. Your compost pile should never contain meat, ashes or charcoal.

The above list should have provided you with a some good ideas on becoming an even better organic gardener. It’s great that you have such an interest in the subject. Going organic is ‘green’; it is healthy, and it is enjoyable!