Organic Gardening Can Be Easier Than You Think

When it comes to organic gardening, take note that it requires a lot of patience, as well as a green thumb. The goal of this hobby is to grow pesticide-free and healthy food that you can enjoy. It actually isn’t as hard as it sounds. The advice in this article will help you to become a successful organic gardener.

When you buy seeds for your garden, be sure to purchase seeds that are labeled “certified organic.” This ensures that your plants will be organic throughout their lifespan and that the seeds you are buying aren’t contaminated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Watch out for labels, such as “genetically engineered” or any mention of “natural” that does not include the phrase “certified organic.”

If you don’t have the space to have an actual garden in the ground, it’s perfectly acceptable to have an organic garden in containers. There are only a few root vegetables like asparagus that won’t grow well in containers, so feel free to explore. Containers are perfect to grow organic tomatoes, green beans, green onions and many other organic vegetables.

A great rule of thumb to follow when planting an organic garden is less is more. While you’ll want to plant a little more than you think you will need in case of rot or pests, you don’t want to overdo it because you’ll end up with much more than you can handle.

Use a raised garden bed when planting your plants. Not only does it provide a minor defense against the common vegetable pests, raised garden beds are also warmer during the spring. The planter becomes warmer because it isn’t surrounded by several inches of isolating ground-soil. The warmer climate will result you being able to plant earlier.

Dry your herbs immediately after harvesting them to prevent rot. Rot is usually caused by moisture either within the herb or on top of it. Moisture can cause the production of harmful bacteria that may cause rot on the herb, or produce a nasty by-product which will then spoil your harvest.

Make liquid fertilizer from your compost. By adding a little bit of water to the biological decay, you can harvest the nutrient rich concoction and spread it on your plants in an efficient way. By fermenting the compost with about an equal amount of water can give you a great form of liquid fertilizer that will help promote growth without negative side effects or toxic run-off.

Fertilize your soil with organic compost. Organic gardeners tend to fertilize their soil twice in one season: once prior to planting, and then again in the middle of a growth cycle. The best fertilizer to use is an organic compost, as it releases nutrients slowly unlike chemical fertilizers, which release nutrients in one go and then lose their effect.

Organic gardening takes patience and hard work. This hobby makes use of the land around us to grow something that tastes really good. If you do the hard work and take the time, you will learn the ropes of organic gardening.