Organic Gardening Woes? Try These Great Ideas!

How one takes care of their organic garden can say a lot about them as a person. An activity that focuses on working in the dirt and relying on nature and time is what makes organic gardening enjoyable. That can sound intimidating to a new organic gardener, which is why they should read the list of tips below.

Reduce the need for pesticides in your garden by planting native crops. Native plants will have a better resistance against the bugs and bacteria of your area, and will be better equipped to compete with native weeds. Native plants will attract beneficial native insects, such as ladybugs, which can naturally control pest problems without the need for chemicals.

Learn to water your garden efficiently. A soaker hose can be laid in the garden and left on with low water pressure. This frees you up from having to hand-water the plants, so you can do other gardening work. Take care with seedlings, though — they are still delicate and need to be watered by hand.

Embrace earthworms in the organic garden! Earthworms are an organic gardener’s best friend. Through tunneling and their nitrogen-rich castings, they can help to aerate the soil. This improves the amount of oxygen that gets to a plant’s roots, improves water retention capacity, and keeps the soil loose and workable. They actually raise much-needed minerals from the garden’s subsoil to the topsoil, where plants can get the greatest benefit. These worms also break up hardpan soil, which is detrimental to root growth.

Blend flowering fruit shrubs into your regular landscape. Don’t have a separate area to turn into a garden? Elderberries, blueberries and currants have pretty flowers in springtime and look great in the fall as well. The side benefit of these landscape-enhancing plants is all the fruit they produce for you to enjoy.

When trying to add compost to your organic garden, find a better way to get the compost there. It can be a pain to have to move wheel-barrows of compost to your garden. You could try layering newspaper down the walkways of your garden, and adding straw to the top. Near the end of the season, the compost will be ready to be added to your garden and you only have to move it from the walkway to the beds on each side.

Examine the soil for its physical condition. If your soil is dense, water will not go deep enough into the soil, and the plant roots will stay close to the surface, resulting in shallow roots. The soil will also be hard to dig. You want your soil to be loose enough so that plant roots can grow downward instead of sideways.

Organic gardening really is a time and labor intensive activity, but that does not mean it is only for serious organic gardeners. This relaxing activity can be enjoyed by anyone with any kind of gardening skills. These tips were constructed to help those of all skill sets find out how to grow their own organic plants.