The Basics Of How To Grow An Organic Garden

Many people see organic gardening as a way to contribute to the safe-keeping of our beautiful planet. For others it presents the opportunity to put nutrient-rich and chemical-free food on the table. Both are laudible reasons. Whatever your reason is, you may find that these suggestions really help.

A great tip when beginning an organic gardening is to add lime to your seed-starter mix. This is done to reduce the acidity of your peat. Too much acidity can damage it. You should aim to add around 1/4 teaspoon of lime in every single gallon of your seed-starter mix.

You can save time by using soaker hoses. Instead of standing with a hose for a long time or having to refill a container, set your water pressure on low and let your hose sit next to the plant that needs to be watered. Do not forget to turn the water off later.

Dry your herbs immediately after harvesting them to prevent rot. Rot is usually caused by moisture either within the herb or on top of it. Moisture can cause the production of harmful bacteria that may cause rot on the herb, or produce a nasty by-product which will then spoil your harvest.

Location is very important to organic gardening. Your garden should be in an area that will get at least ten hours of sunlight during the summer. Prior to starting your garden, make sure that your location does not have any large obstructions that will cast shadows and block the sun. Plants need an adequate amount of sunlight to live.

Try not to let the chores associated to your organic garden build up. While you may not be able to spend a lot of time every day in your garden, even little items done daily will stop the mountain of work from growing. For example, while your canine is outside going to the toilet, take the time to pull out a few weeds.

If you are new to organic gardening and are interested in growing vegetables, you should be aware that certain plants are much easier to start with than others. For example, broccoli, onions, and peppers are amongst the easiest. You should also be aware that different plants have different growing timetables. These timetables are available online. After selecting which plants you want to grow, look up their timetables so you know when to plant them.

When developing your compost pile, use equal measures of dried and green material. Green plant material can include old flowers, fruit waste, grass clippings, vegetable waste, and leaves. Dry materials, like sawdust, cut up wood pieces, cardboard, straw and shredded paper are good for your compost pile. Never use ashes, meat, charcoal, diseased plants or carnivorous animal manure in your compost pile.

The above list should have provided you with a some good ideas on becoming an even better organic gardener. It’s great that you have such an interest in the subject. Going organic is ‘green’; it is healthy, and it is enjoyable!