Top Tips For A Thriving Organic Garden

The dangerous and harsh chemicals used on larger farm crops can get into water supplies, like creeks or wells. Unfortunately, this can lead to people getting sick or, in some cases, dying. You can learn how to do this from this article.

Water your organic garden with storm water runoffs and collected rainwater. Rainwater is more pure and better for plants than home tap water, because it won’t contain chemicals such as chlorine or fluoride. Using rainwater also helps in reducing your overall water usage. Rainwater can even be stored in barrels or cisterns to be used during dry spells.

A great way to deal with weeds in a safe and nontoxic way, is to use a spray bottle of diluted dish soap to treat areas with overgrowth in your garden. Use a ratio of one tablespoon of mild dish soap per 16 ounces of water. Spray the weeds once a day and with in a week they should shrivel up and be easier to pull out.

Tend to your garden a few steps at a time. A garden requires ongoing maintenance, and becomes a big time drain if you let things pile up until the weekend. Stop by the garden for a few minutes each day and deadhead some flowers while you’re waiting for dinner to cook or pull a few weeds while watching the kids play.

Keep your soil healthy. One of the best ways to deter pests from eating up your hard work in your organic garden is to make sure your soil is good. If your growing medium becomes imbalanced, it will become an attractive place for all kinds of unwanted visitors. Check pH and moisture levels often.

Know your soil. Before you being planning and planting your garden, be sure to test the pH of the soil. The acidity or alkalinity of the soil has a huge impact on the types of crops that can be successful on the plot. Take readings from several different areas of the garden as pH can differ from spot to spot. Adjust the soil or your plants as necessary based on what you find.

Don’t harm your native critters. Some animals can naturally keep the bug population down; one such example of a good pest-predator is the bat. Bats are well-known for being bug consumers. Since your garden may sometimes look like a tasty treat to these tiny critters, having bats around can help reduce their population naturally, without the usage of harmful pesticides.

Location is very important to organic gardening. Your garden should be in an area that will get at least ten hours of sunlight during the summer. Prior to starting your garden, make sure that your location does not have any large obstructions that will cast shadows and block the sun. Plants need an adequate amount of sunlight to live.

Now that you’ve read this article, it is probably clear to you that it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to grow organic produce. If you can simply follow some easy-to-implement tips, you can be well on your way to gardening success. Memorize these tips and put them to use and grow the garden you’ve been wanting.