Top Tips For A Thriving Organic Garden

If you are feeling like organic gardening is an overwhelming subject, then you are in the right place. When thinking about how to go about growing your garden, just remember that the more knowledge you have, the easier it should go when you’re forming strategies and implementing those strategies towards your gardening endeavors.

If you live in the city, you can still reap the benefits of organic gardening through container gardening. Herbs especially will thrive in indoor pots, as long as they are large enough. Container gardening can be easier than outdoor gardening when going organic, as there is less risk of exposure to insect pests or weeds.

Use companion plants. Companion planting is the pairing of plants within your vegetable garden, such as planting cabbage with tomatoes. Companion planting helps reduce the problems with insect pests, as it attracts natural pest-controlling wildlife. Companion planting is also a better use of the space in your garden, since you basically have two plants in the same plot.

Grow your own organic tomatoes easily. Tomatoes love light, so choose a spot that gets sun all day long. Allow space between your tomato plants to reduce the chance of soil diseases that will affect your crop. If you buy seedlings instead of sprouting your own, stay away from small seedlings with poorly developed root systems; they will take weeks to show any real growth.

Use a raised garden bed when planting your plants. Not only does it provide a minor defense against the common vegetable pests, raised garden beds are also warmer during the spring. The planter becomes warmer because it isn’t surrounded by several inches of isolating ground-soil. The warmer climate will result you being able to plant earlier.

Use a nicely finished compost pile as fertilizer for your garden. Organic means that you don’t use artificial fertilizers or herbicides to grow your plants, yet sometimes the soil isn’t necessarily full of the proper nutrients for growth. Utilizing a compost pile can provide you with a rich, dark earthy soil that can provide your plants with plenty of nutrients.

Rotate your crops to prevent permanent populations of pests in your garden. As with any ecosystem, pests need a certain amount of time to nest and build up a proper population within a garden. These pests are specially suited for one environment and one food source. By switching their food source you can essentially keep your pest population down simply because they are unable to adapt to the new type of plant.

Use organic mulch. Any material that is spread over the soil is considered mulch. It helps to keep weeds at bay, holds moisture in the soil, and keeps the ground cool in summer and warm in winter. Examples of mulch include compost, shredded leaves, fine wood chips, straw and grass clippings.

Research plants before bringing them home. When you are trying to get the best plants for your organic landscape, you should take the time to get educated. Chose plants that are suited to growing conditions you already have, rather than trying to build an environment for a plant you didn’t properly plan for.

Your compost pile should contain green plant materials and dry plant materials. Add grass clippings, waste from fruits and vegetables, leaves, and weeds for the green materials in your compost pile. Dried plant material includes straw, sawdust, shredded paper, cardboard, and dried and cut-up woody material. Avoid ashes, meat, charcoal and diseased plants in your compost.

With all of the knowledge you just learned about gardening, you want to start forming plans and implementing those plans to the best of your ability. When it comes to gardening, you have to go outside and get yourself dirty, while you try out the strategies you have formed, when you do that you’re going to see what does and doesn’t work and from there, you can form new strategies.