What You Can Do To Improve Your Organic Gardening

Organic gardening can be very intimidating to someone that has never done it before. It can easily lead to a bit of information overload because of all of the resources available to new organic gardeners. Below are some tips to assist you in getting all of this information organized to where you can start growing organic plants effectively.

When you are organic gardening in a humid environment, water your plants in the early morning hours. This will help you prevent mildew. Watering in the morning also prohibits fungal growth that can occur in humid climates. You do not want mildew or fungal diseases to spread, it can lead to poor growth and unhealthy soil.

Make your own compost. If you create your own compost at home, you can be absolutely certain of what goes into it, unlike if you purchase bags of compost from a gardening store. In addition, composting in your yard will attract helpful native wildlife such as insects that will balance the ecosystem of your garden.

A great way to calculate the timing for planting your plants in an organic garden is to use a seed-starting chart. You should do your research and fill in the chart in advance. Once you have it, you can use the chart to plan your planting through the entire season.

Establish a precise schedule to know when you should plant your seeds. Even if you are growing your plants indoors, you should follow a schedule that matches the season and outside temperature. Spend some time on your schedule at the beginning of a season and you should be able to improve it the next year.

Start your organic garden with a good strategic plan. This helps you know exactly where each plant will go in your garden so that you can maximize the few hours you have to garden each day. As part of your plan, take notes on what plants you will use to replace short-lived crops such as spinach and lettuce.

It’s simple to quickly prepare your soil for the planting of a perennial garden. Use your spade to slice chunks of turf up, then flip each piece over, and spread wood chips on top to a depth of four inches. Let the area have about two weeks, then dig it and plan the new perennials.

An organic alternative to chemical fertilizer is compost. You can make your own compost by using fruits, vegetables and other organic wastes from your home. Compost gives your soil the nutrients it needs and improves its structure.

Calculate how much water your plants truly need. Thinner plants generally need more water; they contain larger surface area with less capacity to store water. Plants with large, thick waxy leaves are often more suited for water-starved environments. Over-watering may also cause problems with the plant due to microbial growth on their roots.

Carefully consider the location you choose to plant trees. Remember that your trees will likely get huge. Make sure trees are not planted too close to any structure or foundation. The costs involved, to remove a tree and roots that have gotten into your structures, can be astronomical. This will be easy to avoid with proper planning.

If you have plants that love acid in your organic garden, especially tomato plants, then coffee grounds make great mulch. It’s simple to scatter the coffee grounds around your plants and then sit back and let the high levels of nitrogen help your acid-loving plants grow to great heights all summer long.

Hopefully, these tips have provided you with some very valuable information, as well as given you a way to organize all of the thoughts and information you may have already gathered about organic gardening. Keeping these tips in mind when you start growing your plants can help you become a very successful organic gardener.