What You Need To Learn About Organic Gardening

What are your personal thoughts on organic gardening? Do you view everything you can on the subject, and try to improve upon your own garden? There are numerous resources available such as magazines, videos, books, shows, etc. So where do you begin with your own techniques? Try going through these tips to find your starting point.

If you plan to raise organic plants inside, you need to think about how much light they will get. If your dwelling does not enjoy a great deal of natural sunlight, it makes sense to grow only those varieties meant to thrive in such environments. If you do and this does not help, consider investing in some grow-lights.

As soon as your seeds start sprouting make sure they have enough light. Move your plants next to a sunny window or put them inside a greenhouse. If you cannot do this, use fluorescent lights. Remember that your plants need up to sixteen hours of light every day.

Make easy work of washing your organic produce with a laundry basket. As you pick your produce, lay them in a plastic laundry basket, which works as a strainer. Hold the hose over the top and the water can make quick work of rinsing all the dirt and other matter off of your fruits and veggies.

Encourage bees, wasps, ladybirds and other beneficial insects. These insects are vital in an organic garden. Bees are nature’s most efficient pollinator, and wasps and ladybirds prey on destructive insects in the garden. Ladybirds are particularly effective at ridding your plants of aphids. To attract these beneficial insects, plant companion herbs and flowers around the edge of your vegetable garden.

Location is very important to organic gardening. Your garden should be in an area that will get at least ten hours of sunlight during the summer. Prior to starting your garden, make sure that your location does not have any large obstructions that will cast shadows and block the sun. Plants need an adequate amount of sunlight to live.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

Now that you have an idea on where to start crafting your own organic gardening techniques are you ready to start experimenting? Are you ready to apply what you read to your garden? Can you help your garden grow properly? If you can, then have fun! If not, make sure to review the tips again.